Furs on Film – The Stuff (1985)

If you’re in the business of reviewing films for marginally esoteric fashion content, specific genres are generally to be avoided. Even in the ‘80s, teens in horror movies did not typically find themselves in oversized fox fur coats. That’s not to say there aren’t exceptions to the horror movie rule, and if you’re making a high-concept, horror satire of fast food consumerism, you’re dialing up Antonovich Furs for some wardrobe support. Let’s dip into The Stuff.

The Stuff – The Film

The movie is about discovering a thick white goo bubbling up from the ground that is marketed as an alternative to ice cream. Ice cream execs hire “industrial saboteur” David “Mo” Rutherford (Michael Moriarty) to sabotage The Stuff and put ice cream back on top. The fact that The Stuff eventually turns you into a zombie is a minor detail that has little to do with the film at the point we arrive. As of this writing, Wikipedia has a painfully detailed plot synopsis of The Stuff, which I’m sure will disappear by the time I click “publish” on this post.

The Stuff – The Furs

There are 2 fur scenes; the first is one of a few faux commercials for “The Stuff” that clearly suggests The Stuff’s marketing team went back to the well later. This is “special guest star” Tammy Grimes in a black telling us she left ice cream behind for The Stuff.

Tammy Grimes in a Black Mink Fur Coat - The Stuff - 1985

Later, Rutherford arrives on the same set where new commercials are being filmed. Look, while I generally endeavor to accurately list who is doing the fur wearing in the films I review, that is just not an option here. The credits list only Lisa Crosby and Christine Angelica as ”Stuff Girl.”

Model in a White Fox Fur Coat and a Hooded White Fox Fur Coat - The Stuff - 1985

There are way more than two models and not even a batch of uncredited performances in IMDb to help out, so just enjoy the show. Literally. The sequence mostly shows the models in oversized ‘80s fur coats doing runway walks with cartons of The Stuff.

Model in a Marble Fox Fur Coat and a Blush Fox Trimmed Fur Coat - The Stuff - 1985

This is basically a short video essay entitled “Why the ‘80s Are Awesome.”

Model in a White Fox Fur Trimmed Coat and a Blush Fox Fur Coat - The Stuff - 1985

For people reading this in 2022, you need to understand. The film included this because fur was fashionable, desirable, and sexy in the . That’s how you get credits like these in lots of 80’s flicks.

Model in a Fox Fur Coat and a Lynx Fur Coat - The Stuff - 1985

And in the 1980s, “fur coat’ was just shorthand for large, power fox coats.

Model in a White Fox Fur Coat and a Lynx Fur Coat - The Stuff - 1985

Eventually, all good things must be ruined by directorial choices. The camera loses interest in featuring the fur fashion show and relegates it to the background as Rutherford talks with the director. It is not ideal, but we get to who I will presume is either the credited Lisa Crosby or Christine Angelica centered on the screen in a magnificent coat.

Model in a Silver Fox Fur Coat - The Stuff - 1985

There is some value in the wide shot, as the models are shown milling around the stage in their fox and coats or passing across the scene in the background. Bonus points for the mannequins in the background also in huge fox coats.

Models in a Fox Fur Coats - The Stuff - 1985

After that, the movie had nothing else to offer on the fur fashion front. Suffice to say, pre-Law and Order Michael Moriarty saves the world. I feel compelled to point out, should anyone be… concerned… at no point in the film does any of the thick, white “Stuff” come into contact with any of the large, sumptuous fox fur coats. Readers may choose to do with that information what they wish.  The ratio is thin because this is basically a “one scene wonder” even though there are, technically, 2 fur scenes.

Fur Runtime: approx 2.25 minutes
Film Runtime: 87 minutes
On-Screen Fur Ratio: 2.6%

Find-A-Fur: The Stuff

  • 03:57 – 04:19 – Black Mink Coat
  • 10:33 – 13:57 – The Modeling Scene

Timecodes are approximate.

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